Kiwi Pear Baby Smoothie

My baby is a smoothie addict. Not a bad thing to be, since it makes his five-a-day fruit/veggie quota easy to fill, but it can be a bit hard on the pocketbook if we only use ready-to-eat pouches from the supermarket. Which we obviously don’t, since I enjoy making my own baby food, but there definitely are situations (any outing longer than a few hours, for example) where convenience and shelf stability trump freshness and low costs. Having a few of these in my bag when we’re on the go during a mealtime has saved my butt on more than one occasion. Though I have been making purees for the little guy since he started solids, I hadn’t even considered making him full-fledged smoothies until I brought home a stack of different store-bought ones for him to sample and was impressed to see him suck a pouch dry in under a minute.

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Ella’s Green One smoothies are his favorite, with the rest of the range not far behind. With five 3 oz pouches per box costing about €5.50, you can see why his pack-a-day habit can easily add up. The packaging does provide a useful ingredients listing for making our own version, though, and the caps are reusable with our own refillable pouches.

The home version that I do varies from batch to batch in fruit content, depending on what we happen to have on hand, but is pretty much as follows:

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25% pear. In this case, 4 large peeled raw pears, costing a little over 1 euro.

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25% banana. 5 medium bananas, costing about 1 euro.

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15% kiwi. 6 kiwis, costing about 2 euro.

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35% apple. 2 small jars of homemade, homegrown organic applesauce, the unsweetened and unspiced variety. My prediction that one baby could eat our entire harvest of apples well before a year had passed is rapidly proving true, by the way.

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Blend, blend, blend. The kiwi seeds won’t really break down, but we didn’t get any complaints about them.

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One bonus of homemade smoothies is customizing your add-ins. I usually throw in 1 tub of Greek yogurt (costing a little over 2 euro) to make sure he’s getting enough dairy in his diet. Thick strained yogurts in particular (like the Greek/Turkish/Bulgarian ones that are taking over a large section of the aisle at our supermarket) are good for adding a bit of protein and fat to the mix. The yogurt cultures make it nicely digestible for the under-1-year crowd.

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Finished product. I usually help myself to a glass of this before portioning the rest for baby 🙂

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Since this batch was made for documentation purposes, however, I put it all into pouches. I filled 6 4.5 oz pouches (the cute cartoon animal Squooshi ones) and 8.5 7 oz pouches (the Little Green Pouches). 86.5 oz total for under €7 — €8.50 or so if I hadn’t used our own applesauce — puts final costs at about .08¢ per ounce. Store bought clocks in at 37¢ an ounce, but that’s for pure fruit whereas mine has added yogurt, so it’s probably not as comparable as I’d first meant it to be. Still, you get the point 🙂

These all go in the freezer and I defrost two a day in hot water to cover the day’s meals. I usually have at least two different flavors in the freezer at all times, so he gets a bit of variety. Throwing a frozen pouch in my bag also works nicely if I’m going to use it for lunch, since it defrosts over the next few hours and is soft-but-pleasantly-cool by the time it is going to be eaten. Lately, I’ve been adding more non-fruit items into the mix, since they have been received so well. More on that to come!

2 Comments:

  1. Well, I was going to ask you if you had any applesauce left that we could have, but I guess you’re getting through it okay! Also, let me know what yogurt you buy for him – I haven’t been able to figure out what’s okay other than the one brand that has a Greek flag fairly predominantly displayed on the label. 🙂

    • I use the Valio lactose free Greek yogurt, since it’s the one I usually have around for my own consumption as well. It looks like this:

      And as for applesauce — no worries, there’s still a lot left! Do you want flavored or unflavored? I still have several bags of frozen apples downstairs that I plan to process once we run out of the already canned stuff, so it’s not like I’m exactly low on supply 🙂

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